Lima, still a World Culinary Capital

Lima is now the top-ranked destination city in Latin America with over four million international visitors, and for good reason, not the least of which is the food scene, both old and new. The capital of Peru has grown in recent years to be a world culinary center. The flavors of Peru are based on a history of global and multi-cultural influences: Japanese, Chinese (chifa), Spain, West African, Creole as well as home-grown regional styles, from the Pacific coast to the Andes and the Amazon. Signature Peruvian dishes include antichuchos, papas a la huancaina, lomo saltado, and its own version of ceviche, among many others.

Proof of Lima’s emergence as a gastronomic world capital are the three Lima restaurants that made ‘The World’s 50 Best Restaurants’ list for 2016 (and we can make reservations for you, well in advance of course):

Central (#4) - A gastronomic exploration of elevation and ecosystem. Central takes guests on a culinary expedition through Peru’s ecosystem, from the Amazon to Pacific coast to high Andes. Chef Virgílio Martínez and his team forage in the jungle, desert, mountains and sea to discover diverse local ingredients found at every altitude.

Maido (#13) – Chef Mitsuharu Tsumura blends the culinary styles of Peru and Japan with a menu that focuses on Japanese flavors and techniques under a distinct Peruvian vision.

Astrid y Gastón (#30) – a Lima standard since 1994. Chef Gastón Acurio and wife/pastry chef Astrid Gutsche are pioneers of the Lima food scene and are responsible for helping to transform contemporary Peruvian cuisine into what it is today.

As with most major cities, Lima is also home to a variety of local food markets. The Surquillo Market and the San Isidro Market are two of the most popular.

Our exclusive ‘A Taste of Lima’ tour begins with a walk through the center of Miraflores, includes stops at the well-known Surquillo Market. Along with your private guide you will be able to meet with vendors and try any of the exotic fruits on display. Then on to another notable culinary destination: the San Isidro Market. The last stop will be a cooking class with Chef Gonzalo at his intimate top-floor restaurant at the Hotel Runcu. He will give an in-depth comprehensive lesson on making a typical Peruvian meal and a Pisco Sour, which you will enjoy after the class.

Don’t think your Peru food experience ends in Lima. Most travelers move on from Lima to other parts of this diverse country, notably the Inca capital of Cusco. During your stay In Cusco we can arrange private Cusquenian food tours that feature Cusco’s best restaurants, neighborhood eateries and markets. Our private food tours can be arranged to take place at any time of the day: for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Depending on your preferences we can include fine dining or casual places, street markets, cafeterias. Typical Cusquenian dishes include Tamales, Adobo de Cerdo, and Papa Rellena. Pisco Sours can be sampled most anywhere. If you want to get hands-on we also arrange cooking classes where you work alongside a local chef, prepare a meal and enjoy your work!

In Lima and Cusco our food tours feature a dynamic selection of local hotspots off the standard tourist trail, picked by guides who are local foodies and know the best places. For dining on your own we can provide a list of recommendations and make reservations at the restaurant(s) of your choice.

 

 

Travel Tips
When renting a car, inspect the vehicle with the sales rep and document with photos any dents, dings, or damages prior to leaving the rental company to avoid any back and forth on its return.
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